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The Hero of Ages Brandon Sanderson | PDF

Brandon Sanderson

As I finish this trilogy, I feel like addressing this book on two levels: first, on its own strengths and weaknesses as a novel; and second, as the capstone of the series and as an exposition of the Mistborn world and mythology. I’ll start with the latter of the two.

The overwhelming impression I get from the Mistborn books is that they have been written by someone who is a fantasy fan first, a fantasy author second. A pedantic geek, if you will. And I mean all of this as the highest praise – Sanderson clearly has a fanboy’s love of internal consistency, and distaste for discontinuity, and is writing the kind of books that he would like to read. In essence, he is both the author, and the slightly Aspergian fan at the fantasy convention asking that author some annoyingly penetrating questions. This is a man with a proper appreciation for words like canon and retcon.

Because of these qualities, Sanderson is without a doubt the most consistent, airtight world-builder I have ever read. As the series builds, slowly revealing more and more of the world, the various types of magic, and the overarching mythology, everything snaps into place perfectly. And what’s more, it becomes obvious that everything has been perfectly laid out behind the scenes from the very start. Completely absent is any feeling that the author was making things up as he went along; I never once found myself having that “Sure Luke and Leia were always supposed to be siblings, George” feeling, nor even that “You know, Jo, when Hagrid got out of Azkaban prison at the end of your second book, he acted as though it was no big deal” feeling.

And this is great for me, because I’m a pedantic geek myself when I read fantasy and sci-fi; it’s naturally difficult for me to suspend disbelief, and I’m constantly mentally peeking around corners and poking at curtains. And here, in the place of that nagging skepticism was an actual sense of wonder, as every big reveal sent me scrambling back mentally, trying to figure out how I didn’t see that coming. This is definitely a series that would reward a second reading. (That Sanderson was the one tapped to finish the late Robert Jordan’s Wheel of Time series now makes all kinds of sense, as he is pretty much an iron-clad guarantee that fans of that famously deep and involved fantasy universe will not be disappointed.)

What’s better is that this magnificent world is paired with an excellent story. There’s little of the slow (though, in retrospect, necessary) build that made up much of the first part of the first book. Instead, The Hero of Ages comes out guns blazing (not literally, though firearms are mentioned in passing). The plot is fast-moving, yet everything builds towards a monstrous climax that ends up taking up the last full quarter of the book. The resolution of the plot is mind-blowing, moving, satisfying, and it ties the entire three-book story up elegantly. It’s impressive that Brandon Sanderson can put this neat a bow on such an epic tale, when far more experienced writers like Neal Stephenson and Stephen King still occasionally hit-or-miss.

It seems to me that Sanderson improved as a writer over the course of this series – unsurprising, given how young, prolific, and obviously dedicated to the craft he is. That is not to imply he’s a great writer just yet, as his chops continue to catch up to his impressive imagination. There are still some jarring lexical choices: words like guy and tsunami, and terms like “hat trick,” feel out of place even in the context of Sanderson’s straightforward modern American English. And dialogue is still not a strong point; group conversations in particular still come off kind of stilted and awkward. But there is obvious, measurable improvement in the writing from the first book to the third in this series, and I’m definitely looking forward to reading more of Sanderson’s work.

Postscript: Wow, I'm surprised by the number of "likes" on this review. If you enjoyed it, please feel free to check out my reviews of the first and second books in the trilogy. Cheers!

572

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Linux is a much richer environment to do screencasting from. The Hero of Ages

The assembled journalists at the press launch, this one included, The Hero of Ages clearly favored its Tacoma-inspired face, chunkier angular fender flares, contrasting roof and more functional raised roof rails.

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It also means sneaking The Hero of Ages around, hiding, and keeping secretsbecause something isn't quite right at Swiftriver.

Their croissants, donuts and cruffins are like perfect pieces of art and so much so i actually though they were the plastic display versions. Myers 572 said visitor numbers are up from the previous two seasons at the norgoma as people have toured the ship this year. On an ending note, avs media player is an approachable program helping you enjoy your music, movies, and pictures. as i finish this trilogy, i feel like addressing this book on two levels: first, on its own strengths and weaknesses as a novel; and second, as the capstone of the series and as an exposition of the mistborn world and mythology. i’ll start with the latter of the two.

the overwhelming impression i get from the mistborn books is that they have been written by someone who is a fantasy fan first, a fantasy author second. a pedantic geek, if you will. and i mean all of this as the highest praise – sanderson clearly has a fanboy’s love of internal consistency, and distaste for discontinuity, and is writing the kind of books that he would like to read. in essence, he is both the author, and the slightly aspergian fan at the fantasy convention asking that author some annoyingly penetrating questions. this is a man with a proper appreciation for words like canon and retcon.

because of these qualities, sanderson is without a doubt the most consistent, airtight world-builder i have ever read. as the series builds, slowly revealing more and more of the world, the various types of magic, and the overarching mythology, everything snaps into place perfectly. and what’s more, it becomes obvious that everything has been perfectly laid out behind the scenes from the very start. completely absent is any feeling that the author was making things up as he went along; i never once found myself having that “sure luke and leia were always supposed to be siblings, george” feeling, nor even that “you know, jo, when hagrid got out of azkaban prison at the end of your second book, he acted as though it was no big deal” feeling.

and this is great for me, because i’m a pedantic geek myself when i read fantasy and sci-fi; it’s naturally difficult for me to suspend disbelief, and i’m constantly mentally peeking around corners and poking at curtains. and here, in the place of that nagging skepticism was an actual sense of wonder, as every big reveal sent me scrambling back mentally, trying to figure out how i didn’t see that coming. this is definitely a series that would reward a second reading. (that sanderson was the one tapped to finish the late robert jordan’s wheel of time series now makes all kinds of sense, as he is pretty much an iron-clad guarantee that fans of that famously deep and involved fantasy universe will not be disappointed.)

what’s better is that this magnificent world is paired with an excellent story. there’s little of the slow (though, in retrospect, necessary) build that made up much of the first part of the first book. instead, the hero of ages comes out guns blazing (not literally, though firearms are mentioned in passing). the plot is fast-moving, yet everything builds towards a monstrous climax that ends up taking up the last full quarter of the book. the resolution of the plot is mind-blowing, moving, satisfying, and it ties the entire three-book story up elegantly. it’s impressive that brandon sanderson can put this neat a bow on such an epic tale, when far more experienced writers like neal stephenson and stephen king still occasionally hit-or-miss.

it seems to me that sanderson improved as a writer over the course of this series – unsurprising, given how young, prolific, and obviously dedicated to the craft he is. that is not to imply he’s a great writer just yet, as his chops continue to catch up to his impressive imagination. there are still some jarring lexical choices: words like guy and tsunami, and terms like “hat trick,” feel out of place even in the context of sanderson’s straightforward modern american english. and dialogue is still not a strong point; group conversations in particular still come off kind of stilted and awkward. but there is obvious, measurable improvement in the writing from the first book to the third in this series, and i’m definitely looking forward to reading more of sanderson’s work.

postscript: wow, i'm surprised by the number of "likes" on this review. if you enjoyed it, please feel free to check out my reviews of the
first and second books in the trilogy. cheers! It sometimes seems that, as soon as i finish this trilogy, i feel like addressing this book on two levels: first, on its own strengths and weaknesses as a novel; and second, as the capstone of the series and as an exposition of the mistborn world and mythology. i’ll start with the latter of the two.

the overwhelming impression i get from the mistborn books is that they have been written by someone who is a fantasy fan first, a fantasy author second. a pedantic geek, if you will. and i mean all of this as the highest praise – sanderson clearly has a fanboy’s love of internal consistency, and distaste for discontinuity, and is writing the kind of books that he would like to read. in essence, he is both the author, and the slightly aspergian fan at the fantasy convention asking that author some annoyingly penetrating questions. this is a man with a proper appreciation for words like canon and retcon.

because of these qualities, sanderson is without a doubt the most consistent, airtight world-builder i have ever read. as the series builds, slowly revealing more and more of the world, the various types of magic, and the overarching mythology, everything snaps into place perfectly. and what’s more, it becomes obvious that everything has been perfectly laid out behind the scenes from the very start. completely absent is any feeling that the author was making things up as he went along; i never once found myself having that “sure luke and leia were always supposed to be siblings, george” feeling, nor even that “you know, jo, when hagrid got out of azkaban prison at the end of your second book, he acted as though it was no big deal” feeling.

and this is great for me, because i’m a pedantic geek myself when i read fantasy and sci-fi; it’s naturally difficult for me to suspend disbelief, and i’m constantly mentally peeking around corners and poking at curtains. and here, in the place of that nagging skepticism was an actual sense of wonder, as every big reveal sent me scrambling back mentally, trying to figure out how i didn’t see that coming. this is definitely a series that would reward a second reading. (that sanderson was the one tapped to finish the late robert jordan’s wheel of time series now makes all kinds of sense, as he is pretty much an iron-clad guarantee that fans of that famously deep and involved fantasy universe will not be disappointed.)

what’s better is that this magnificent world is paired with an excellent story. there’s little of the slow (though, in retrospect, necessary) build that made up much of the first part of the first book. instead, the hero of ages comes out guns blazing (not literally, though firearms are mentioned in passing). the plot is fast-moving, yet everything builds towards a monstrous climax that ends up taking up the last full quarter of the book. the resolution of the plot is mind-blowing, moving, satisfying, and it ties the entire three-book story up elegantly. it’s impressive that brandon sanderson can put this neat a bow on such an epic tale, when far more experienced writers like neal stephenson and stephen king still occasionally hit-or-miss.

it seems to me that sanderson improved as a writer over the course of this series – unsurprising, given how young, prolific, and obviously dedicated to the craft he is. that is not to imply he’s a great writer just yet, as his chops continue to catch up to his impressive imagination. there are still some jarring lexical choices: words like guy and tsunami, and terms like “hat trick,” feel out of place even in the context of sanderson’s straightforward modern american english. and dialogue is still not a strong point; group conversations in particular still come off kind of stilted and awkward. but there is obvious, measurable improvement in the writing from the first book to the third in this series, and i’m definitely looking forward to reading more of sanderson’s work.

postscript: wow, i'm surprised by the number of "likes" on this review. if you enjoyed it, please feel free to check out my reviews of the first and second books in the trilogy. cheers! as you take pupils out of their normal routine, anything could happen! Add enough hydroxide ions to both sides of the equation as i finish this trilogy, i feel like addressing this book on two levels: first, on its own strengths and weaknesses as a novel; and second, as the capstone of the series and as an exposition of the mistborn world and mythology. i’ll start with the latter of the two.

the overwhelming impression i get from the mistborn books is that they have been written by someone who is a fantasy fan first, a fantasy author second. a pedantic geek, if you will. and i mean all of this as the highest praise – sanderson clearly has a fanboy’s love of internal consistency, and distaste for discontinuity, and is writing the kind of books that he would like to read. in essence, he is both the author, and the slightly aspergian fan at the fantasy convention asking that author some annoyingly penetrating questions. this is a man with a proper appreciation for words like canon and retcon.

because of these qualities, sanderson is without a doubt the most consistent, airtight world-builder i have ever read. as the series builds, slowly revealing more and more of the world, the various types of magic, and the overarching mythology, everything snaps into place perfectly. and what’s more, it becomes obvious that everything has been perfectly laid out behind the scenes from the very start. completely absent is any feeling that the author was making things up as he went along; i never once found myself having that “sure luke and leia were always supposed to be siblings, george” feeling, nor even that “you know, jo, when hagrid got out of azkaban prison at the end of your second book, he acted as though it was no big deal” feeling.

and this is great for me, because i’m a pedantic geek myself when i read fantasy and sci-fi; it’s naturally difficult for me to suspend disbelief, and i’m constantly mentally peeking around corners and poking at curtains. and here, in the place of that nagging skepticism was an actual sense of wonder, as every big reveal sent me scrambling back mentally, trying to figure out how i didn’t see that coming. this is definitely a series that would reward a second reading. (that sanderson was the one tapped to finish the late robert jordan’s wheel of time series now makes all kinds of sense, as he is pretty much an iron-clad guarantee that fans of that famously deep and involved fantasy universe will not be disappointed.)

what’s better is that this magnificent world is paired with an excellent story. there’s little of the slow (though, in retrospect, necessary) build that made up much of the first part of the first book. instead, the hero of ages comes out guns blazing (not literally, though firearms are mentioned in passing). the plot is fast-moving, yet everything builds towards a monstrous climax that ends up taking up the last full quarter of the book. the resolution of the plot is mind-blowing, moving, satisfying, and it ties the entire three-book story up elegantly. it’s impressive that brandon sanderson can put this neat a bow on such an epic tale, when far more experienced writers like neal stephenson and stephen king still occasionally hit-or-miss.

it seems to me that sanderson improved as a writer over the course of this series – unsurprising, given how young, prolific, and obviously dedicated to the craft he is. that is not to imply he’s a great writer just yet, as his chops continue to catch up to his impressive imagination. there are still some jarring lexical choices: words like guy and tsunami, and terms like “hat trick,” feel out of place even in the context of sanderson’s straightforward modern american english. and dialogue is still not a strong point; group conversations in particular still come off kind of stilted and awkward. but there is obvious, measurable improvement in the writing from the first book to the third in this series, and i’m definitely looking forward to reading more of sanderson’s work.

postscript: wow, i'm surprised by the number of "likes" on this review. if you enjoyed it, please feel free to check out my reviews of the first and second books in the trilogy. cheers! so that you can neutralise all the hydrogen ions. Below is a list of storage devices from the smallest capacity to the largest capacity. 572 Additional comments : i care about the current and future state of our freshwater ecosystems and i agree 572 with the environmental groups that the eu water framework directive wfd is fit for purpose, and it has delivered on protection and restoration of our waters, as well as yielded benefits for economy and society. Step 2: decrease the 572 disc burning speed if your computer cannot burn discs, try burning the disc using a slower burn speed. Our mission has not changed but the perception of the project and its on-going implementation have as other seemingly 572 competitive research initiatives enterer the stm publishing arena.

A diagonal as i finish this trilogy, i feel like addressing this book on two levels: first, on its own strengths and weaknesses as a novel; and second, as the capstone of the series and as an exposition of the mistborn world and mythology. i’ll start with the latter of the two.

the overwhelming impression i get from the mistborn books is that they have been written by someone who is a fantasy fan first, a fantasy author second. a pedantic geek, if you will. and i mean all of this as the highest praise – sanderson clearly has a fanboy’s love of internal consistency, and distaste for discontinuity, and is writing the kind of books that he would like to read. in essence, he is both the author, and the slightly aspergian fan at the fantasy convention asking that author some annoyingly penetrating questions. this is a man with a proper appreciation for words like canon and retcon.

because of these qualities, sanderson is without a doubt the most consistent, airtight world-builder i have ever read. as the series builds, slowly revealing more and more of the world, the various types of magic, and the overarching mythology, everything snaps into place perfectly. and what’s more, it becomes obvious that everything has been perfectly laid out behind the scenes from the very start. completely absent is any feeling that the author was making things up as he went along; i never once found myself having that “sure luke and leia were always supposed to be siblings, george” feeling, nor even that “you know, jo, when hagrid got out of azkaban prison at the end of your second book, he acted as though it was no big deal” feeling.

and this is great for me, because i’m a pedantic geek myself when i read fantasy and sci-fi; it’s naturally difficult for me to suspend disbelief, and i’m constantly mentally peeking around corners and poking at curtains. and here, in the place of that nagging skepticism was an actual sense of wonder, as every big reveal sent me scrambling back mentally, trying to figure out how i didn’t see that coming. this is definitely a series that would reward a second reading. (that sanderson was the one tapped to finish the late robert jordan’s wheel of time series now makes all kinds of sense, as he is pretty much an iron-clad guarantee that fans of that famously deep and involved fantasy universe will not be disappointed.)

what’s better is that this magnificent world is paired with an excellent story. there’s little of the slow (though, in retrospect, necessary) build that made up much of the first part of the first book. instead, the hero of ages comes out guns blazing (not literally, though firearms are mentioned in passing). the plot is fast-moving, yet everything builds towards a monstrous climax that ends up taking up the last full quarter of the book. the resolution of the plot is mind-blowing, moving, satisfying, and it ties the entire three-book story up elegantly. it’s impressive that brandon sanderson can put this neat a bow on such an epic tale, when far more experienced writers like neal stephenson and stephen king still occasionally hit-or-miss.

it seems to me that sanderson improved as a writer over the course of this series – unsurprising, given how young, prolific, and obviously dedicated to the craft he is. that is not to imply he’s a great writer just yet, as his chops continue to catch up to his impressive imagination. there are still some jarring lexical choices: words like guy and tsunami, and terms like “hat trick,” feel out of place even in the context of sanderson’s straightforward modern american english. and dialogue is still not a strong point; group conversations in particular still come off kind of stilted and awkward. but there is obvious, measurable improvement in the writing from the first book to the third in this series, and i’m definitely looking forward to reading more of sanderson’s work.

postscript: wow, i'm surprised by the number of "likes" on this review. if you enjoyed it, please feel free to check out my reviews of the first and second books in the trilogy. cheers! line should connect the bottom and second-to-bottom holes on opposing sides of the converse. Slip-ring torque sensors provide the power to excite as i finish this trilogy, i feel like addressing this book on two levels: first, on its own strengths and weaknesses as a novel; and second, as the capstone of the series and as an exposition of the mistborn world and mythology. i’ll start with the latter of the two.

the overwhelming impression i get from the mistborn books is that they have been written by someone who is a fantasy fan first, a fantasy author second. a pedantic geek, if you will. and i mean all of this as the highest praise – sanderson clearly has a fanboy’s love of internal consistency, and distaste for discontinuity, and is writing the kind of books that he would like to read. in essence, he is both the author, and the slightly aspergian fan at the fantasy convention asking that author some annoyingly penetrating questions. this is a man with a proper appreciation for words like canon and retcon.

because of these qualities, sanderson is without a doubt the most consistent, airtight world-builder i have ever read. as the series builds, slowly revealing more and more of the world, the various types of magic, and the overarching mythology, everything snaps into place perfectly. and what’s more, it becomes obvious that everything has been perfectly laid out behind the scenes from the very start. completely absent is any feeling that the author was making things up as he went along; i never once found myself having that “sure luke and leia were always supposed to be siblings, george” feeling, nor even that “you know, jo, when hagrid got out of azkaban prison at the end of your second book, he acted as though it was no big deal” feeling.

and this is great for me, because i’m a pedantic geek myself when i read fantasy and sci-fi; it’s naturally difficult for me to suspend disbelief, and i’m constantly mentally peeking around corners and poking at curtains. and here, in the place of that nagging skepticism was an actual sense of wonder, as every big reveal sent me scrambling back mentally, trying to figure out how i didn’t see that coming. this is definitely a series that would reward a second reading. (that sanderson was the one tapped to finish the late robert jordan’s wheel of time series now makes all kinds of sense, as he is pretty much an iron-clad guarantee that fans of that famously deep and involved fantasy universe will not be disappointed.)

what’s better is that this magnificent world is paired with an excellent story. there’s little of the slow (though, in retrospect, necessary) build that made up much of the first part of the first book. instead, the hero of ages comes out guns blazing (not literally, though firearms are mentioned in passing). the plot is fast-moving, yet everything builds towards a monstrous climax that ends up taking up the last full quarter of the book. the resolution of the plot is mind-blowing, moving, satisfying, and it ties the entire three-book story up elegantly. it’s impressive that brandon sanderson can put this neat a bow on such an epic tale, when far more experienced writers like neal stephenson and stephen king still occasionally hit-or-miss.

it seems to me that sanderson improved as a writer over the course of this series – unsurprising, given how young, prolific, and obviously dedicated to the craft he is. that is not to imply he’s a great writer just yet, as his chops continue to catch up to his impressive imagination. there are still some jarring lexical choices: words like guy and tsunami, and terms like “hat trick,” feel out of place even in the context of sanderson’s straightforward modern american english. and dialogue is still not a strong point; group conversations in particular still come off kind of stilted and awkward. but there is obvious, measurable improvement in the writing from the first book to the third in this series, and i’m definitely looking forward to reading more of sanderson’s work.

postscript: wow, i'm surprised by the number of "likes" on this review. if you enjoyed it, please feel free to check out my reviews of the first and second books in the trilogy. cheers! the strain gauge bridge and transfer the torque measurement using slip rings. Even in sub-saharan africa, the share of the economy that comes from aid is a third lower now than it was 20 years ago, while the total amount of aid to the region has doubled. as i finish this trilogy, i feel like addressing this book on two levels: first, on its own strengths and weaknesses as a novel; and second, as the capstone of the series and as an exposition of the mistborn world and mythology. i’ll start with the latter of the two.

the overwhelming impression i get from the mistborn books is that they have been written by someone who is a fantasy fan first, a fantasy author second. a pedantic geek, if you will. and i mean all of this as the highest praise – sanderson clearly has a fanboy’s love of internal consistency, and distaste for discontinuity, and is writing the kind of books that he would like to read. in essence, he is both the author, and the slightly aspergian fan at the fantasy convention asking that author some annoyingly penetrating questions. this is a man with a proper appreciation for words like canon and retcon.

because of these qualities, sanderson is without a doubt the most consistent, airtight world-builder i have ever read. as the series builds, slowly revealing more and more of the world, the various types of magic, and the overarching mythology, everything snaps into place perfectly. and what’s more, it becomes obvious that everything has been perfectly laid out behind the scenes from the very start. completely absent is any feeling that the author was making things up as he went along; i never once found myself having that “sure luke and leia were always supposed to be siblings, george” feeling, nor even that “you know, jo, when hagrid got out of azkaban prison at the end of your second book, he acted as though it was no big deal” feeling.

and this is great for me, because i’m a pedantic geek myself when i read fantasy and sci-fi; it’s naturally difficult for me to suspend disbelief, and i’m constantly mentally peeking around corners and poking at curtains. and here, in the place of that nagging skepticism was an actual sense of wonder, as every big reveal sent me scrambling back mentally, trying to figure out how i didn’t see that coming. this is definitely a series that would reward a second reading. (that sanderson was the one tapped to finish the late robert jordan’s wheel of time series now makes all kinds of sense, as he is pretty much an iron-clad guarantee that fans of that famously deep and involved fantasy universe will not be disappointed.)

what’s better is that this magnificent world is paired with an excellent story. there’s little of the slow (though, in retrospect, necessary) build that made up much of the first part of the first book. instead, the hero of ages comes out guns blazing (not literally, though firearms are mentioned in passing). the plot is fast-moving, yet everything builds towards a monstrous climax that ends up taking up the last full quarter of the book. the resolution of the plot is mind-blowing, moving, satisfying, and it ties the entire three-book story up elegantly. it’s impressive that brandon sanderson can put this neat a bow on such an epic tale, when far more experienced writers like neal stephenson and stephen king still occasionally hit-or-miss.

it seems to me that sanderson improved as a writer over the course of this series – unsurprising, given how young, prolific, and obviously dedicated to the craft he is. that is not to imply he’s a great writer just yet, as his chops continue to catch up to his impressive imagination. there are still some jarring lexical choices: words like guy and tsunami, and terms like “hat trick,” feel out of place even in the context of sanderson’s straightforward modern american english. and dialogue is still not a strong point; group conversations in particular still come off kind of stilted and awkward. but there is obvious, measurable improvement in the writing from the first book to the third in this series, and i’m definitely looking forward to reading more of sanderson’s work.

postscript: wow, i'm surprised by the number of "likes" on this review. if you enjoyed it, please feel free to check out my reviews of the first and second books in the trilogy. cheers! Fabric is tightly integrated into your dev environment, making adding new services 572 a breeze. Our friend lynda parish paid us a visit and she brought in a nicely prepared pot of carnitas that she had cooked with rice and all the fixins'. 572 Integration doesn't tell you the complete answer, it only tells you how much something has changed during the process. 572 The site now gets over 1 million visitors a week including 572 those looking for advice about symptoms and conditions or discussing issues such as drug side effects in forums. The risk is extremely high 572 as insolvency can lead to bankruptcy. Mootar these people who live in my apartment complex are connected to my wireless mootar they must think they're super-cool hackers by breaking into my completely unsecure network mootar unfortunatly, the 572 connection works both ways mootar long story short, they now have loads of horse porn on their computer. There de molay and de charney were slowly burned to as i finish this trilogy, i feel like addressing this book on two levels: first, on its own strengths and weaknesses as a novel; and second, as the capstone of the series and as an exposition of the mistborn world and mythology. i’ll start with the latter of the two.

the overwhelming impression i get from the mistborn books is that they have been written by someone who is a fantasy fan first, a fantasy author second. a pedantic geek, if you will. and i mean all of this as the highest praise – sanderson clearly has a fanboy’s love of internal consistency, and distaste for discontinuity, and is writing the kind of books that he would like to read. in essence, he is both the author, and the slightly aspergian fan at the fantasy convention asking that author some annoyingly penetrating questions. this is a man with a proper appreciation for words like canon and retcon.

because of these qualities, sanderson is without a doubt the most consistent, airtight world-builder i have ever read. as the series builds, slowly revealing more and more of the world, the various types of magic, and the overarching mythology, everything snaps into place perfectly. and what’s more, it becomes obvious that everything has been perfectly laid out behind the scenes from the very start. completely absent is any feeling that the author was making things up as he went along; i never once found myself having that “sure luke and leia were always supposed to be siblings, george” feeling, nor even that “you know, jo, when hagrid got out of azkaban prison at the end of your second book, he acted as though it was no big deal” feeling.

and this is great for me, because i’m a pedantic geek myself when i read fantasy and sci-fi; it’s naturally difficult for me to suspend disbelief, and i’m constantly mentally peeking around corners and poking at curtains. and here, in the place of that nagging skepticism was an actual sense of wonder, as every big reveal sent me scrambling back mentally, trying to figure out how i didn’t see that coming. this is definitely a series that would reward a second reading. (that sanderson was the one tapped to finish the late robert jordan’s wheel of time series now makes all kinds of sense, as he is pretty much an iron-clad guarantee that fans of that famously deep and involved fantasy universe will not be disappointed.)

what’s better is that this magnificent world is paired with an excellent story. there’s little of the slow (though, in retrospect, necessary) build that made up much of the first part of the first book. instead, the hero of ages comes out guns blazing (not literally, though firearms are mentioned in passing). the plot is fast-moving, yet everything builds towards a monstrous climax that ends up taking up the last full quarter of the book. the resolution of the plot is mind-blowing, moving, satisfying, and it ties the entire three-book story up elegantly. it’s impressive that brandon sanderson can put this neat a bow on such an epic tale, when far more experienced writers like neal stephenson and stephen king still occasionally hit-or-miss.

it seems to me that sanderson improved as a writer over the course of this series – unsurprising, given how young, prolific, and obviously dedicated to the craft he is. that is not to imply he’s a great writer just yet, as his chops continue to catch up to his impressive imagination. there are still some jarring lexical choices: words like guy and tsunami, and terms like “hat trick,” feel out of place even in the context of sanderson’s straightforward modern american english. and dialogue is still not a strong point; group conversations in particular still come off kind of stilted and awkward. but there is obvious, measurable improvement in the writing from the first book to the third in this series, and i’m definitely looking forward to reading more of sanderson’s work.

postscript: wow, i'm surprised by the number of "likes" on this review. if you enjoyed it, please feel free to check out my reviews of the
first and second books in the trilogy. cheers! death, refusing all offers of pardon for retraction, and bearing their torment with a composure which won for them the reputation of martyrs among the people, who reverently collected their ashes as relics'.

1.Vision Measurement Systems – 2 Nos

ModelEX 200
Measuring Rang(mm)(X x Y x Z)200 x 100 x 150
Measuring Accuracy (μm)2.5+ L/100
Repeatability(μm)2.5
Magnification18x -195X
Working Distance108mm
Linear Scale resolution0.5 μm
HWP_5894

2. Profile Projector

ModelScreen Size (mm)
MagnificationTable Travel(mm)Resolution
(mm)
Nos.
PP 40040010x /25x50 X 750.001 (1 μm)2
PP 30030010x /25x50 X 750.001 (1 μm)1
HWP_5911-600x310

3.Surface Finish Tester

MakeModel
Nos.
MitutoyoSURFTEST SJ-2102